Curricular Unit:Code:
Chemistry997QUIM
Year:Level:Course:Credits:
1UndergraduateQuality, Environment and Safety Management4 ects
Learning Period:Language of Instruction:Total Hours:
Winter SemesterPortuguese/English52
Learning Outcomes of the Curricular Unit:
The aim of the course of Chemistry is to ensure students a good base preparation in chemistry to enable them to tackle problems in their future professional activities. The course looks to develop the student’s critical thinking and problem analysis capabilities from the perspective of PBL (Problem-Based Learning) and to familiarize students with safety and work rules when dealing with chemical products.
Syllabus:
1. Basic concepts of chemistry
1.1. Matter, States of Matter.
1.2. Atoms, molecules, ions.
1.3. The periodic table.
1.4. No. of Advogadro and Molar Mass
1.5. Chemical formulas
1.6. Introduction to nomenclature of inorganic compounds.
2. Gaseous and liquid states
2.1. Equation of perfect gases.
2.2. Liquid solutions. Concentration. Dilution.
3. Chemical reactions
3.1. Stoichiometric calculations.
3.2. Notion of chemical equilibrium. Equilibrium constant. Le Chatelier principle.
3.3. Acids and bases.
3.4. Precipitation reactions. Product of solubility.
3.4.1. Gravimetric and volumetric analysis.
3.5. Oxidation-reduction reactions.
3.6. Electrochemistry.
4. Introduction to organic chemistry
4.1. Families of organic compounds
4.2. Physical properties of organic compounds
4.3. Reactivity of organic compounds
Demonstration of the Syllabus Coherence with the Curricular Unit's Objectives:
The first three chapters are intended to provide the future manager of quality, environment and safety with fundamental concepts about the structure and transformation of matter so that he acquires a microscopic view of matter, perceives how this microscopic structure is reflected in the macroscopic properties, and also understand how matter Is transformed via chemical reactions (notably reactions in aqueous media) and how these reactions can be used to produce products of interest and in chemical analysis.
Chapter 4 deals with the chemistry of organic compounds. These compounds are of fundamental importance in our technological progress, yet many are associated with serious safety and environmental pollution problems.
Teaching Methodologies (Including Evaluation):
The methodology of teaching and learning is expository, interrogative and demonstrative. In the theoretical -practical, and during the laboratory classes, problems, exercises and experimental work are proposed to be solved in the classroom and after in study hours. The teaching of the course is complemented with periods of attendance to students outside of the classroom.
EVALUATION:
The model of continuous evaluation:
The elements involved in the classification of this component are the following:
• Written tests for individual assessment (80%);
• Papers written / proposed projects for extra-class (10%);
• Participation and performance in the classroom (10%).
Demonstration of the Coherence between the Teaching Methodologies and the Learning Outcomes:
The lectures are intended to convey the complex knowledge that the filed of Chemistry involves and to orient the study of the student. Problem solving and laboratory work enable the self-assessment of the learner and allow it to apply the theoretical knowledge acquired seeking to develop a critical and analytical way to deal with problems from a perspective of Problem-Based Learning.
Reading:
[1] Chang, R., Overby, J. Chemistry. McGraw-Hill. 13th Edition. 2019.
[2] Breck, W. E., Brown, R. J. C. and McCowan, J. D., Chemistry for Sciences and Engineering. McGraw-Hill Ryerson. 2ª Edição. 1983.
[3] Callister, W. D., Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais: Uma Introdução. Livros Téc. e Cient. Editora, 7ª edição, 2009.
[4] Solomons, T.W.G.; Fryhle, C.B. - Organic Chemistry - John Wiley & Sons, 8th Edition, 2004.
[5] Manahan S. E. - Environmental Chemistry, 10th Ed. CRC Press (2017).
Lecturer (* Responsible):
Sérgio Barreira (barreira@ufp.edu.pt)