Curricular Unit:Code:
Social and Cultural Anthropology777ASC
Year:Level:Course:Credits:
1UndergraduatePolitical Science and International Relations6 ects
Learning Period:Language of Instruction:Total Hours:
Winter SemesterPortuguese/English78
Learning Outcomes of the Curricular Unit:
The main objective is to provide a broad perspective of Anthropology as a discipline that aims the study of social and cultural systems. Also, will be briefly approached both the path and the theory and practice of Social Anthropology, in addition to some of the more relevant study areas of Anthropology. To approach, briefly, some subjects which are more relevant for the characterization of the human cultures.
Students shall develop autonomous capacities for to depict world human cultures as the result of the individual path of communities spread in different geographical spaces. Students shall understand the dynamics of identitarian processes while yeast of cultural individuality. Students shall develop a schematic perspective over cultural phenomena, in order to assume an attitude of both curiosity and tolerance towards cultural differences between human societies along their professional future.
Syllabus:
The dichotomy biology/culture as a trigger to cultural strategies. The theoretical framework of Anthropology, and its field of work. Humankind as a producer of culture, and the individualism of cultures related to space and time. Types, strategies and symbolism within the processes of social communication. Family as the base of social structure, and the models of family classification and kinship. Models of family structure and their relation to the social system. Social reproduction and the management of the family heritage. The interaction of groups, from family to the community, and the systems of personal inter-relation. The foundations of belief, and the social imaging of the world through myths, rites and religions. The structural character of the cycle of life.
Demonstration of the Syllabus Coherence with the Curricular Unit's Objectives:
The main objective is to provide a broad perspective of Anthropology as a discipline that aims the study of social and cultural systems. Also, will be briefly approached both the path and the theory and practice of Social Anthropology, in addition to some of the more relevant study areas of Anthropology. To approach, briefly, some subjects which are more relevant for the characterization of the human cultures.
Students shall develop autonomous capacities for to depict world human cultures as the result of the individual path of communities spread in different geographical spaces. Students shall understand the dynamics of identitarian processes while yeast of cultural individuality. Students shall develop a schematic perspective over cultural phenomena, in order to assume an attitude of both curiosity and tolerance towards cultural differences between human societies along their professional future.
Teaching Methodologies (Including Evaluation):
Teaching methodology will focus on lecturing, research of specific subjects, reading and discussion of selected bibliography, as well as group debates over selected subjects. Occasionally, viewing of quality documentaries on selected subjects will support and illustrate the presentation and the discussion of both concepts and realities. Assessment will be continuous and based on a written test, an essay and a group research essay with oral presentation and work discussion. Students will also be asked to participate in theoretical and practical tasks in the classroom, and on the participation of external activities such as seminaries and conferences decurring in the University.
Demonstration of the Coherence between the Teaching Methodologies and the Learning Outcomes:
Module 1: Presentation of the duality biology/culture, while outlining the role of both the biological and the cultural in human condition. Reference to human ethology within the framework of behaviouralist theories, and approach to the biologically based differences, such as sex and ethnics. Life within groups, and the internal Dynamics of groups. In this module students will view some BBC produced documentaries by Desmond Morris (The Human Animal) to support and illustrate some of the subjects, as complementary to lectures, to support group discussion. Module 2: Brief approach to the history of anthropology, and its most relevant theories, and its methods and objectives. Definition of culture and its characterizing features, both material and immaterial. This module will be based on lecturing and reading of selected bibliography, as a theoretical support to group discussion. Module 3: General perspective of communication and its wide range of processes, through few selected examples, such as oral communication, the gift, patronage, the language of the body, and cultural identity. For this module one selected documentary will be viewed, as complementary to lecturing. Module 4: Brief discussion over the concept of ethnicity and the diverse models of societies organization in a diachronical perspective, thus covering from family level groups to industrial urban societies. Lecturing will be complemented to short presentations by students, as a result of reading research supervised by the lecturer. Module 5: The image of family as an unit of social reproduction, and its multiple variations in form and structure. The intrinsic relations between family, house and heritage, and the cycle of life within family life. Here, students will view a documentary bearing relevant information on one of the module’s subjects, in order to promote group discussion, and in addition to regular lectures. Module 6: The dualities rural/urban and both the material and symbolic structures of their respective places. The places and the gender symbolics, the neighbourhood social relations. For this module, lecturing will be supported by slide presentation, and students will be encouraged to oral presentation of one theme. Module 7: Presentation of the conceptual principles of the beliefs in the supernatural, and their diverse structural levels. The impact of beliefs in the relations between spaces and individuals. The pedagogical method will comprehend lectures, viewing of one documentary, and selected readings.
Reading:
—Boshchung, Dietrich; Bremmer, Jan N. (eds.) (2015)The Materiality of Magic. Padernborn, Wilhelm Fink.
—Erickson, Paul A.; Murphy, Liam D. (2016) A History of Anthropological Theory. Toronto, University of Toronto Press (5th. ed.).
—Kuklick, Henrika (Ed.) (2007) New History of Anthropology. Oxford, Blackwell
—Nahm, Sheena; Rinker, Cortney Hughes (edits.) (2016) Applied anthropology: unexpected spaces, topics, and methods. Oxford, Routledge.
—Smith, Michael E. (Edit.) (2012) The Comparative Archaeology of Complex Societies. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
—Stanish, Charles (2017) The evolution of human co-operation: ritual and social complexity in stateless societies. New York, Cambridge University Press.
—Turner, Bryan S. (edit.) (2006) The Cambridge Dictionary of Sociology. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
—Wright, James D. (edit.) (2015) International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam, Elsevier.